The Future of The Music Industry: Post Covid-19

Corona Virus, Covid-19, Infinite Vibrations, Innovation, Music Industry

Has Covid-19 crippled the music industry, or will it help shape our future for good? 

The current music industry is uncertain…but has Covid-19 been a force for bad, or has it enabled us to re-think the music industry for the better? Let’s look at this once in a lifetime phenomenon and see what it means for the future of music creators. 

The cancellation of Live Performances 

Firstly, let’s talk about the Live Performance side of the music industry. With the global music industry being worth $50 billion, the live performance side of this makes up 50% of the industry. However, it was this crucial part of a musician’s career that was most affected. As musicians base most of their income on live performances and events, it was a drastic loss to their income when most, if not all, of these live events were cancelled or postponed; especially during the summer months when musicians can make the most of their income due to the festival period.  

But why was this such a gamble in the first place? 

Well, musicians earn most of their income from live events because of the way the music industry has changed in recent years. With the invention of the internet came a wave of new technology which caused changes in the ways we consume music. That being streaming sites, first started by Napster and now most popular with Spotify. Music has become a commodity that you can listen to virtually for free, and with Spotify’s subscription model of business, this pays very little out to musicians per stream; £0.0028 to be exact. According to data from The Trichordist, an active movement which campaigns for an ethical and sustainable internet for music creators, sites like Pandora and YouTube are even worse, with Pandora paying £0.0016 and YouTube paying £0.0012 per stream. The best current site for music streaming, but still not able to pay a living wage, is Amazon, who pay £0.009 per stream.  

Average payout per stream by The Trichordist

“On average, it takes 343.5 streams to generate £1 and 2,947 streams to earn one hours UK minimum wage.” 

Infinite Vibrations

To add to this, major record labels earn $800,000 per hour from streaming sites and the tech giants that made these software’s also take a sizeable cut, leaving musicians in the fray. If it wasn’t musicians in the first place though, the record labels and the tech giants wouldn’t even have a business on which to build around music. 

So why do musicians get the worst cut in this deal? 

That’s a good question, and the unfair pay artists receive from streaming is something that multiple musicians and organizations have recently begun to fight against. This comes in the form of the #brokenrecord and #keepmusicalive hashtag and we fully support this. Infact Scottish singer-songwriter KT Tunstall recently released a video explaining all this on BBC radio 5 Live as part of their “Re-think” series. Check it out here: 

KT Tunstall on the future of music streaming

After a lack of income from streaming, this means that musicians can earn more of an income from live music than recorded music, so this is the much-preferred income stream; albeit just not during the corona virus lockdown/pandemic. Regular events aren’t seen to return until 2021, when even then there will be tight health restrictions which limit attendees furthermore limiting the revenue generated from ticket sales. 

Although, we are starting to see some resurrection of live music. Prestigious artists such as Dizzie Rascal, Gary Numan and The Lightening Seeds have all signed on to play drive-in gigs. The audience will be completely restricted to their car and see’s live performances being able to adhere to social-distancing rules whilst being able to still take place.  

This is all well and good for artists who have a big enough following and the funds to be able to pull something like this off, but what about the independent and unsigned artists? 

Music venues in dire need of help 

Well, this is where it gets a little dark… independent artists’ usual performance spaces, grass roots music venues, are facing a dire time indeed. Due to the lockdown, many of these venues have not been able to bring in an income are still facing rent charges by their landlords or brand businesses who own, but do not manage, the venues. 

Recently, a 5-stage plan to re-open theatres and art spaces was released by the UK government to outline the return of theatres and art spaces, which went like this: 

UK Government’s 5-stage plan to re-open theatres and art spaces

However, this has been unacceptable as it will still see many venues go out of business by the time step 5 has come around; cutting it very close and causing a lot of stress on venue owners. 

“Only 17% of grass roots music venues were reported as being financially secure until July 8th

William Ralson

In response to this, the Music Venue Trust, a charity which acts to protect grass roots music venues, sent an open letter to the UK government asking them to deliver more support to these establishments. This included two calls to action: 

1. A £50 million financial support package 

2. A VAT reduction on future ticket sales 

In reality, the music industry is not receiving the help that it deserves… the UK music industry contributed £5.2 billion to the UK economy in 2018 and it feels like we are still trying to prove the importance of music to the government, besides the fact that people wouldn’t have mentally survived lockdown without the arts or creativity. 

But you can help music venues to recover. In a video posted by the CEO of the Music Venue Trust on Facebook, he is calling people to send the open letter they have written to your local MP, in a bid to raise awareness of this issue and save music venues in the UK; and we implore you to do the same. Check out his video here: 

Music Venue Trust CEO tells you how to write to your MP to prevent the permanent closure of hundreds of Grassroots Music Venues

You can also support this campaign by posting the #saveourvenues on social media. 

Unfortunately, this is only the tip of the iceberg for live performances, as the most major blow to this ecosystem is a new announcement made by Live Nation. 

The controversy of Live Nation 

Live Nation is the biggest music business responsible for live performance, ticketing and event management. They own Ticketmaster and generated $11.55 billion in revenue in 2019. 

So, you can imagine that they we’re also hit hard by the impact of corona virus, but not as bad as the grass roots music venues or independent musicians. Live Nation can still survive even if they took a profit hit from 2020, the low-to-mid tier artists can’t.  

They’ve released a change in their policy for live events in 2021. In order to protect their own assets, they’ve thrown musicians under the bus. In their policy changes they’ve proposed a 20% pay decrease for artists across the board. On top of this, musicians will be responsible for their own insurance and their own travel fees and the icing on the cake, if unforeseen circumstances cause the event to be cancelled, artists will not be paid at all.  

However, in a drastic turn of events, Live Nation have now redacted some of these policy changes due to how they we’re boycotted by nearly every musician this was affected by. 

“If artists weren’t treated poorly already, they sure are now.” 

Infinite Vibrations

Musicians have already been dealt a bad hand, in that they can’t earn a decent wage from recorded music and now it seems their most important income stream is also being taken away.  

So where does that leave musicians? 

Re-defining your music career and the future of the music industry 

By now you’ve probably become a little fed up with the way the industry is treating musicians, and the impact of corona virus hasn’t helped one bit. But, if it wasn’t for musicians creating music, we wouldn’t even have an industry in the first place. So why is it that musicians are always the ones getting dealt the worst cards? 

Day by day the companies which are sat at the top of the music chain are ripping off musicians and taking them for granted. From record labels doing dodgy deals with artists, to promoters who have a bad rep for not even paying artists, as well as the streaming services who pay next-to-nothing for the music that their companies are built on. Even now during corona virus, Live Nation would rather musicians suffered than take a profit loss themselves. 

“We think it’s time for change… and now more than ever would be the right time to re-evaluate the way we think about the music industry.” 

Infinite Vibrations

We see the future of the music industry as being independent and we predict that in the next 5-10 years the independent music industry will grow exponentially, but we also think that Covid-19 has accelerated this underlying trend. 

To bring about a change in the industry, you should think about turning independent. This is because as an independent musician, you retain control over your career and over your music, instead of a record label or a manager who might not have your best interests at heart. We’re not saying everyone is bad and if you want to be signed then you can be, but an independent record label or an independent manager probably cares more about your music then a stakeholder at a major record label. We’re saying that if you become an independent artist, you can get more out of your career. 

On top of this, to earn a living wage from your music, you must consider becoming an entrepreneur; because creating music for a living is the dream isn’t it? This is a mindset and once you begin to see your music through the eyes of an entrepreneur, you will begin to open-up more income streams from your music career. Therefore, enabling you to earn a wage from creating music. For example, you don’t have to be the stereotypical celebrity musician to be successful, as there are more ways to earn an income from your music than just the Hollywood route to fame. Such as freelancing, teaching and livestreaming, as well as releasing your own music.  

We understand that corona virus has been a negative hit to an already unfair industry. But we feel the pandemic has enabled us to highlight the issues in the music industry and provide an opportunity to adapt and make changes for a more positive and constructive future in music. 

What do you think about the music industry? Should we change, or do you think the corona virus is just a blip in the road? Let us know your thoughts down below. 

Statistics in this article are available here:  

  1. https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/05/this-is-how-covid-19-is-affecting-the-music-industry/ 
  2. https://www.esquire.com/uk/culture/a32360709/coronavirus-music-industry/ 
  3. https://thetrichordist.com/category/music-streaming/ 

#brokenrecord #keepmusicalive #saveourvenues #independentmusicindustry #futureofthemusicindustry #streaming #livemusic #entrepreneur #independentmusician #coronavirus #covid19 


Follow our journey on social media below:  

Website: https://infinitevibrations.co.uk/  

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InfiniteVibrations0/  

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/infinitevibrations_/  

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Vibrations0  

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/infinite-vibrations-b8a648176/  

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7DzJuhNKbH5IxMTLwBs6sA 

Join our mailing list for instant updates, discounts and news from Infinite Vibrations. 

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

©infinitevibrations2020 

How To Make An Income During Lockdown

Corona Virus, How to, Infinite Vibrations, Uncategorized

5 revenue streams for musicians during corona virus 

It’s no secret that the corona virus pandemic has damaged the music economy. From the cancellation of nearly every gig and festival, to lockdown preventing musicians from making a quick recovery. This is a hard time for music artists. However, if its anything musicians are known for, it’s overcoming a challenge in the face of adversity, and there hasn’t been a challenge like corona virus in a long time. So, if want to make an income from your music during lockdown, here’s how… 

  1. Live streaming 

We talked about live streaming in our previous article. However, did you know you can monetize those streams and create an income from this kind of content? There are a few ways to do so but let’s start with the simplest.  

Donations. If you’ve set up a high-quality professional livestream, which you can find out how to do in our previous article here: https://infinitevibrations.co.uk/2020/04/15/how-to-set-up-a-high-quality-livestream-for-your-music/, then there’s a good chance people will donate to your cause, especially if they’re dedicated fans. 

As well as this, you could set up a Patreon or GoFundMe to provide fans with rewards for donating. Things such as exclusive content or merchandise. This way you are incentivising paid support from your fans whilst also providing them with a reward for doing so, making their donation worth something to them.  

On top of this, this method is great for creating those dedicated fans, as you can create a funnel to draw them in. Starting with your free piece of content (your livestream) and working up to paid exclusive content. This kills two birds with one stone in that you are developing an income for yourself as well as generating a fanbase who will stay with you after corona virus. 

Finally, if you are a well-developed musician/band you could consider making a paid ticketed stream, like a live event but without the physical appearance (unfortunately).  

For example, if you are charging £30 per ticket for a venue with a 300-person capacity, and you sold out, you would have made £9000. However, if you charge £10, a reduction to your normal rate which is already a selling point, and live streamed to 1000 people you will have made £10,000 – A 10% increase in revenue from the live event, and you wouldn’t have the overheads of travel expenses, eating out and staying in hotels. 

  1. Freelancing 

The world of freelancing is a wide and varied one. It can take some time to master but the financial rewards can be exponential. There are a few income streams with this one and it’s up to you how you want to pursue this. 

To begin let’s talk about music lessons. Chances are that if you’re an accomplished musician you know a thing or two about playing music. What better time than the covid-19 lockdown to start teaching your skills to someone else. This is because budding musicians will have plenty of time to practice and are willing to do so because they have so much time to spare. 

If you’ve got a successful music career behind you, this can be easy to sell too. People will be willing to put their faith, and money, in you – especially if you can say that you’ve been a successful musician in the past.  

You can begin charging small, £10 or £15 per hour and then once you have some great feedback and testimonials you can begin to raise this. Just be careful not to raise prices for current clients as that could cause them to lose interest. As well as this, you can host these lessons online via skype, Zoom or even Facebook. Keeping everyone safe and educated during lockdown. If you’re clients are younger aged children, chances are that their parents will be grateful for giving them something to do, so do be sure to market your lessons towards them too.  

Session musician. Perhaps you’ve played in a band or you’ve had a solo career for a long time, but have you ever considered being a session musician? This type of commission-based work requires you to work to a brief, but if you’re an agile and flexible musician this might be the work for you. 

There are a lot of people out there who require the skill and services of an accomplished musician. From guitar to bass, saxophone to violin; many people will have projects that require the sound of the instrument that you play.  

Try websites such as Freelancer or Fiverr, as many of these platforms let you advertise your skills to a potential client to come and scout out. As well as this, you should join communities and networks of composers who may also require your skills; on social media such as Facebook and LinkedIn.  

What work you take on is up to you but there is a lot of revenue to be made by going down this route and you will be surprised at the amount of people who need session work to be done. Especially if people are creating more music because there are in lockdown.  

Sound packs, samples, loops and beats. If you’re a DJ or producer, then this is perfect for you. However, you may also be a more instrument-based musician who knows how to create music in a DAW. Selling sound packs, samples, loops and beats has become a growing sector of the music industry and there are lots of companies investing in this to create a bespoke service where you can purchase such a thing.  

Companies such as Splice or Arcade by Output are some such companies. If you create a sample or loop, you can sell these products on these platforms.  

As well as this, if you create sound packs and beats, you can sell these to rappers, musicians and singers to provide them with backing tracks for their music. Bear in mind that when you sell these products you waver the copyright to them, but this seems reasonable because you are getting paid to do so. Otherwise this would be a collaboration between yourselves and you would split the profits made from the final piece between each party; which is also a viable option too.  

  1. Podcasts and Radio 

Now there is a lot of current debate about these two different types of audio platforms, in that podcasting seems to be getting extremely popular and radios are dying out, although I don’t think this is true, it’s just that radio seems to an often harder platform be featured on. However, each comes with their own advantages and disadvantages.  

Let’s start with radios. We all know the typical radio station that we hear on our phones, laptops and stereos. These can be a good form of income if you can get featured on them and if you have signed up to a royalty collection agency such as PRS or PPI. But this can take some time if you have not already done so and coronavirus isn’t going away anytime soon. 

So, podcasts are your best friend. These are more independently hosted and crop up everywhere on the internet. Whilst you may not generate as much income from this as you would from radio, the chances of you being able to get your music on these are greatly increased; if you target the correct shows and correct demographic for your genre of music that is.  

On top of this, it is becoming increasingly popular for artists to start podcasts of their own. Whilst it can take time to garner a following and fanbase, much like your music, this can be a great platform for potential sponsorships and brand partnerships who will be willing to pay you to get access to your audience. Just make sure that when you do so, you advertise a product or service that aligns with your general style and morals, in order to stay relevant to your audience and not put them off.  

  1. Busking, Nursing homes and Community groups 

With the lockdown easing soon in July, it seems more appropriate to begin generating revenue from physical appearances again. However, venues and festivals will not be opening for a long time still to come. If you feel comfortable with doing so, the following income streams could be a great way to kickstart live music again. However, with these methods being outside the realm of lockdown be sure to think it through and adhere to any safeguarding guidelines for yourself and the public. 

Why not try your hand at busking? Create a two-meter perimeter around yourself and place a bucket at the edge. Especially with shops opening again, there will be an influx of people going about town and wanting a distraction from the confusion and panic of Covid-19 and perhaps they have a bit of spare change for that welcome sound of good music. Just be sure to wash your hands after handling your hard-earned cash and abide by the lockdown rules where necessary. 

Perhaps contacting your local council to check if you are able to do so would be a good idea and if you didn’t know, some counties ask for a busking license in some areas, so check for that too.  

On top of this, why not try playing in nursing homes and community groups. As I’m sure they’ve seen a wave of upset recently and could do with a pick-me-up of live music. What a great way to celebrate the beginning of the end and do some good in your community. Although, with care homes being in the high-risk category, you may require a test to make sure you don’t have the virus beforehand.  

  1. Miscellaneous  

Finally, a few other options for income streams are merchandise and residencies.  

Merchandise can take some funds to set up if you haven’t already got some, but perhaps handmaking some goodies could be a good way to spend your spare time. As well as this, if you’re creating your own products, that’s a great way to practice entrepreneurship and learn about the fundamentals of creating a profitable income stream – something which will come in handy in your music career in the future.  

On top of this, you could try and secure paid residencies at magazines, radios, podcasts or promotion agencies as they are all likely livestreaming and need talent to book for their streams.  


In conclusion, there are many methods to generate income during coronavirus. Above all you need to remember to stay positive in this situation and allow yourself to adapt, improvise and overcome. Like I mentioned before, musicians are some of the most resilient people in the world and I guarantee you that the industry will make it through this; but only if we work together and find ways to survive.  

If you have any questions or just want to share your thoughts, then please get in contact with us on our social media below. 

If you need help with your music career and navigating these strange times, then you can contact us for a FREE 30-minute career consultancy session and we’ll help you get back on track. 


Contact us here:

  • infinitevibrations0@gmail.com 

Follow our journey on social media below: 


Join our mailing list for instant updates, discounts and news from Infinite Vibrations.

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

How To Set-up a High-Quality Livestream for your Music

Corona Virus, How to, Infinite Vibrations, Uncategorized

A step-by-step guide to get you gigging online. 

In the midst of the corona virus, many artists are converting their physical performances to digitally livestreaming gigs. However, with a flood of musicians doing this, the quality of these livestreams isn’t being regulated. Many artists are rushing to put out as much content as they can in a desperate move to save their careers and continue to make music for their fans.  

In this tutorial, we’re going to teach you how to set-up a high-quality live stream for your music; that will set you apart from everyone else and allow you to deliver content that will engage your fans and generate new ones. 

Firstly, to set-up a live stream you need to consider these five elements.  

  1. Platform 
  1. Hardware  
  1. Software 
  1. Bandwidth 
  1. Tips and tricks 

Platform 

There are a few platforms that offer live streaming services. However, there are four which sit atop the chain of social media giants. This includes Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Twitch. 

Facebook is the most well-known social media platform with over 2 billion active users per month. It is often considered to act as a hub for your music, although a website can also fulfill this role. If you already have a good fanbase on this platform then this would be a brilliant place to begin livestreaming as all your followers will be able to see it automatically. It has some great tools for livestreaming, and it is relatively easy to use with a few hours of practice, also allowing you to test your livestream privately before you go public. 

Instagram is the most well-known photo sharing platform and whilst it doesn’t offer as many options as Facebook, YouTube or Twitch it can be great for a quick stream when you are out and about. It is more of an instant connection to your fans much like Twitter. Livestreams are shorter and are linked to your story which disappears after 24 hours, so it may be good to use this platform for a quick livestream advertising your longer one on a different platform. 

YouTube is the most well-known video streaming platform and has been a behemoth in this area for years. However, the livestreaming tool is only available to those with 1,000 subscribers of more. The reason for this is because of the massive influx of content that is uploaded to YouTube daily, 300 hours of content is uploaded every minute. If everybody livestreamed it would be a massacre of viewership. If you already have a dedicated fanbase built-up on this platform it would be a good option. If this is not that case then don’t completely ignore it, stick to uploading videos and gaining subscribers to meet the requirements to livestream. 

Twitch is the most well-known video game livestreaming platform, but it is slowly becoming more adaptable to a wider variety of content. The greatest thing about this platform is that it specifically specializes in livestreaming and it has done for years with immense success. It can also integrate to a wide variety of encoding software’s, because of its video game lineage, making it one of the easiest and most adaptable services available. It is also a great place to start generating a new audience because of its television like stream selection; displaying each game/topic that is being streamed and then breaking down the different channels streaming that game/topic. If you are new to streaming this is a great option to go with. 

Now you have chosen the correct platform for you, you need to consider how you will livestream to these platforms. This includes your hardware and your software. We will cover the hardware first.  

Hardware 

The hardware you will require for a high-quality stream is as follows. You may only need a phone to technically be able to livestream but taking these other elements into consideration will heighten your professionality and widen your view ship with more retention rates, because of this step-up in quality. 

You will need: 

  • A camera or webcam 
  • A professional microphone 
  • An audio interface 
  • A computer or laptop 

Now let’s breakdown these individually. A camera or webcam should at the very least be 720p and 30fps in quality. However, 1080p will make your livestream even better. This all depends on your budget and if your laptop already comes with a webcam. What “1080p” means is the number of pixels that are on the screen at one time and “fps” means the number of frames per second of your video. If you’re livestream is lagging, this means that you’re fps is lower than 30, as 30fps is the minimum frames per second that the human eye can see smoothly. This could be because of your internet speeds but we will speak about that shortly.  

Your microphone needs to be to some professional level, whether this be a dynamic microphone or a condenser microphone. Make sure you shop around for these types of equipment as they will serve you the best audio quality possible. A good example of this is the Shure SM58, as this has been a staple in the music industry for many years; being used for a variety of purposes from recording to live performance. 

Next, your audio interface. With the advancements in modern recording technology this type of equipment has been made widely available to the average musician and are common in most home studios. You can purchase a high-quality audio interface for as little as £60-£100 and the Focusrite Scarlett series have been on top of their game in this field since the birth of home studios. 

Finally, your computer or laptop. Most modern computers and laptops will be able to process a livestream. However, they should have adequate processing power for encoding and uploading your livestream at the same time. At least an Intel i3 or equivalent should be able to suffice the processing power to support these two needs. As well as this, a decent graphics card may come in handy too.  

The way these pieces of hardware work together are shown in the diagram below. You will need to connect the audio interface to your computer or laptop and the same with your camera. Then connect your microphone to your audio interface. You may also connect your guitar and/or bass directly to your audio interface too via a standard jack lead. Instruments that use the standard jack lead will also be able to connect this way too, otherwise you should mic them up. 

Software 

Now let’s talk about software. This is what you will use to sync up all your outputs into one concise medium and then livestream to your desired platform. A very easy and simple to use software is something like OBS or Open Broadcast Software. It is also free which is a plus. As well as this, there are a plethora of other software’s available on the market ranging from beginner to pro and some which cost more than others. OBS is great to start with but if you are looking for something with more settings to tweak then shopping around for another piece of software is a good call.  

Each piece of software will respond differently to your hardware and getting the right setup may take a few tries but don’t become disheartened. If you become stuck, check out a tutorial on YouTube that depicts how to use your specific software, as there is a heap of videos out there to help you with such a thing. With OBS you can simply add or remove “scenes” in order to create a setup which works for you. You can also include overlays to your livestream with custom graphics that the software allows you to import. Very nifty indeed.  

Bandwidth 

This is a very important step. You will require a fast and stable bandwidth connection to be able to livestream. Basically, bandwidth means the speed and quality of connection you have to the internet. In some more remote areas, you may have a poorer bandwidth, whilst in cities and urban areas you will probably have a great bandwidth.  

To be able to livestream a high-quality piece on content you will need to check the speed of your internet and make sure it can handle uploading either 720p or 1080p. You can do this by searching for a speed checker on the internet and seeing the speed of your internet by mega bites per second. 

On average, the mbps you will need to livestream a 720p 30fps video will be 6mbps-to-1.25mbps and for 1080p this will be between 13mbps-to-2.75mbps. 

This means, if you have an internet speed of 1.25mbps-to-6mbps you should stream in 720p. If you have an internet speed of 2.75mbps-to-13mbps you should stream in 1080p. However, you should never stream below 720p as this will make you look unprofessional. This is because 720p is the lowest type of HD or high-definition quality the human eye can see by. 

Your livestream quality will also depend on the type of encoding software being used and the processing power of your computer or laptop, so make sure you tweak your settings and equipment accordingly.  

Tips and tricks 

Now that you have considered how you will livestream; you should consider these tips and tricks. 

  • Mute notifications, this will stop annoying noises from happening mid-stream and means you can put your full attention on the stream and therefor your fans. 
  • Close inactive and unnecessary applications, this will save you that precious processing power and allow you to focus on the software you need to use at the time. 
  • Perform to the camera, pay attention to your viewers, look into the camera and speak directly to them. This may come with practice as filming yourself can feel a little weird at first but make sure you are engaging with your fans otherwise; they may lose interest. 
  • Composition, what is behind you? What is your setting for the livestream? Don’t livestream in a messy room filled with junk. Make it look nice and provide plenty of lighting so your audience can see you clearly.  
  • Use your phone or another device (bearing in mind your bandwidth usage) to monitor comments, likes, shares and other interactions you may have with your fans. If a viewer posts a question, then you can answer it real-time via your microphone but don’t forget to give it a glance occasionally to monitor your chat and see what is being said. This is the internet after all and sometimes you may have someone using profanity or saying things they shouldn’t in the chat, and you may even have to ban someone from your stream; believe me, the gamers know about this! 
  • Do your research, have a look at what other people are doing on their streams and find new ways of engaging your fans and creating a better environment for everyone. This could be live giveaways, a question time or even a social challenge. Always strive to grow and improve. 

We hope this article was of help to you and if you require any assistance with your livestream or even with your music career you can contact us at infinitevibrations0@gmail.com and we’d be happy to help. 

Hope everyone is keeping safe and well and we look forward to seeing your livestreams come to life! You can share these with us by tagging our social media channels below: 


Join our mailing list for instant updates, discounts and news from Infinite Vibrations.

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

©infinitevibrations2020