A Comprehensive Guide to Networking in the Music Industry

Advice and guidance, Corona Virus, Covid-19, How to, Infinite Vibrations, Music Industry, Networking, Uncategorized

Strategies and methods for networking, even in lockdown. 

Networking is the key to unlocking doors of opportunity within the music industry. Whether it be through meeting your next music collaboration or striking up a conversation with a label executive – meeting people outside of your circle of influence is important to your career because they could bring value and opportunities which can’t be found on your own.  

Although, during a time where events have been cancelled due to the Covid-19 lockdown, it can be hard to meet new people. As well as this, networking can be scary, awkward and a difficult skill to master. 

Fortunately, there are several strategies within networking which can mitigate the initial awkwardness, allow you to network even in lockdown and bridge the gap between your career and its next success.  

You’ve all heard that first impressions count, but did you know why? Let’s explore the psychology and theory behind meeting new people. 

The Psychology of Networking 

Unfortunately, as humans, we have the survival mechanism of deciding what we think of someone new within just 3 seconds of meeting them! People make assumptions based on the clothes you wear, your appearance, how successful you are and how aggressive you are.  

Psychologists call this “Thin Slicing.” 

Other people’s assumptions of you is also based on your status and wealth. In a small study conducted by Dutch researchers they found that “people wearing name-brand clothes — Lacoste and Tommy Hilfiger, to be precise — were seen as higher status and wealthier than folks wearing non-designer clothes” 

Their research concluded that no other social dimensions affected this outcome. Not even attractiveness, kindness or trustworthiness, just status and wealth. Now this sounds shallow, but it is an instinctual process to help protect us and determine whether or not someone is endangering our survival. Fortunately, we can hack this instinct to be perceived as a valuable member of the music industry through our fashion and social skills. 

“If you’ve ever wondered why businessmen and women always wear a suit, this is why.” 

Infinite Vibrations

You can achieve an instant rapport with someone if you wear a suit. When you wear a suit, you automatically convey success to somebody. It symbolizes that you are succeeding, and this has a big effect on people. But don’t think that you must be a stiff and dress formal everyday – especially in the music industry, as we tend to be more expressive and relaxed when it comes to wearing a uniform. However, a t-shirt/blazer combo can achieve the same effect whilst blending casual/formal attire. 

On top of this, you can convince many people of your value by the way you speak. By being slightly more expressive and maybe a little more dramatic, you can make people take notice of what you are saying, just by the way you are saying it. As well as this, if you want to make a point, then less is more. If you’re naturally a quiet person than this can play to your advantage. Timing is everything and if can say something at the right time – it can leave a big impact. 

Now you know how to network with new people, it’s time to learn where to network. 

Where to network in the music industry 

There are many places to network within the music industry. From social media to supporting your local music scene or straight-up attending networking events; Here’s 6 gates into networking

There has never been so much freedom to networking than there is on social media, especially during the current times, where everything has been converted to digital events due to the coronavirus. Some of the best platforms for networking are Facebook, Instagram, Reddit and LinkedIn. 

  1. Facebook 

Facebook gives you access to groups where you can pose questions, engage in a discussion and learn more about a specific topic in the music industry. Try searching for “(your location) music scene” or “(your location) musicians” as well as broader search terms such as “music producers” or “musician support group” and join these groups. 

Initially you may be reluctant to post or comment in these groups but once you feel confident enough, remembering the internet can be a cruel place so wear your tough skin, you should give your thoughts and opinions to these groups, who will then recognise that you are delivering value to them and return the favour when you need it.  

2. Instagram 

Instagram is the underdog of networking via social media. There aren’t many people who see this platform as a mainstream form of networking, which can make meeting new people a fresh experience.  

The first method to use on this platform is to “slide into DM’s” and whilst this may be a meme; it is also a great way to introduce yourself to new individuals. However, copy and pasting a mass message to loads of people about your new song is a definite way to get ignored or even blocked. You need to engage with these accounts before you message them. Give them a complement or ask them a constructive question and engage in a real, meaningful conversation. Get to know them before you talk about your music.  

As well as this, you should really explore hashtags on this platform. Look at the hashtags you are posting and then look at the hashtags your influencers are posting. Find the comparisons and then try to piggyback onto these hashtags and engage with other people who are posting the same or similar hashtags as you. This way can discover new people within your field of music and strike up connections all over the world.

3. Reddit 

Reddit can be a great source of making new connections as their sub-reddit pages act like Facebook groups. Here you can find like-minded musicians and even some industry operatives, especially if they are doing a Reddit AMA (QnA).  

You can search for specific genres and strike up conversation in a relatively anonymous way, in case you feel anxious about meeting new people. Remember, we have been told since birth that we shouldn’t speak to strangers, so it’s no wonder networking can feel weird at times, but this can be a great way around the anxieties of beginning to network.

4. LinkedIn 

Lastly, LinkedIn is a fantastic platform for networking. This is because it eliminates some of the social barriers surrounding the balance between professionalism and friendliness. It does this because LinkedIn as a platform is built for professionals to network with each other and inherently sets that precedent that if you reach out to someone, you assume they are trying to meet and network with you.  

As well as this, LinkedIn has seen organic growth boom due to its lateness to developing an advertisement service, meaning there is a lot of opportunity for people to naturally discover you without having to put that extra legwork into marketing and promotion. But, don’t think this will last forever, as LinkedIn will soon follow suit with Facebook in that they will try to charge you for ad space in order to reach a wider audience. 

5. Supporting your local music scene 

“Speak to other musicians in your scene as they will know who the promoters are, who the venue owners are, who the recording studios are and pretty much every contact you need to push your career from the bedroom and into the limelight” 

Infinite Vibrations

This is arguably the most important form of networking, especially in the early stages of your career. If you’re lucky enough to have a bustling music scene in your town or near where you live, then this will be the bouncing board which will propel your career forward. This is because any good musician or band has always started out surrounding themselves with their local scene and seeking the support of friends and family.  

Your local music scene are the first people who will support you and your music so you should make a conscious effort to become a part of it. Play as many shows as possible in this location and people will begin to recognise you as a house-hold name. As well as this, you should be proud to represent where you come from, as when you begin to spread your wings into other territories, these are the people who will remember you and shout about you from the roof-tops.  

Try to meet at least 3-4 people every time you go to your local venue, because you never know who you could be speaking with and who they know themselves. Just remember not to push your music on them straight away. This is because, if they are not working, they are probably on their down-time and want to relax rather than talk business. Engage in small talk to begin with, test the waters and then proceed to introduce your music to them. This way you are demonstrating that you want to get to know them instead of just using them to further your career. 

6. Conferences and networking events 

Once you have begun to take these first small steps into networking, you are then ready for the big leagues. Conferences and networking events are the crème-de-la-crème for gaining contacts in the music industry. This is because these events are organized for the sole purpose of meeting and engaging with other people and wider communities. They will often host a plethora of key industry figures such as: label executives, managers, promoters, successful musicians and enterprises which aim to help musicians. Here you can meet people who will make a BIG difference to the success of your career. 

As with any networking opportunity, it is best to prepare beforehand, especially for these types of events. First, you should identify who you want to make a connection with, who is attending this event? Choose 2-3 people within your field of music and learn about them, what are their likes/dislikes? Do they have a favorite drink? The more information you know about your desired contact the more points of conversation you will have. Ask them if they would like their favorite drink and go and buy it for them. If there’s something that they dislike then avoid a discussion about that or if you’re feeling confident, demonstrate your knowledge by engaging in a debate about it – just remember to remain courteous. 

On top of this, you need to make sure your web presence is in order. This is because if someone you meet goes to search you online, you need to have an attractive and up-to date website and social media, otherwise they might lose interest. To help encourage your new friends to go online and check out your stuff, you should always have business cards to hand with your website and social media handles advertised on them. They’re relatively cheap to produce now-a-days and they can mean the difference between staying in contact with someone or remaining a stranger. 

As well as this, you should follow-up each new contact with a nice message or email the morning after. This will show that you cared about the conversation and want to continue to develop the relationship outside of the event. Make sure you get the business card of the person you we’re speaking to, as well as handing out your own, so you can remember their contact details too. 

Building and maintaining relationships 

Once you have met someone new and made a connection with them post-event, it’s time to begin developing that relationship so you can benefit each other’s career. 

“If you find networking hard or are struggling with making connections during lockdown, then you should come to one of our new Online Networking Events” 

Infinite Vibrations

I’m sure you’ve all heard the age-old saying “It’s not WHAT you know, its WHO you know” but it’s no good knowing someone if you don’t know how to speak to them in a professional yet friendly manner. Being simultaneously professional yet friendly at the same time is the art of networking. 

It’s all about building a long-term mutually beneficial relationship. Investing time in developing a relationship with someone is one of the most important investments you can make in your career – and all its costs is your time and attention! This can be done by simply checking in on them every now and then or going to a coffee together, it doesn’t even have to be a business call. In fact, the more time you spend together as friends, the stronger your business relationship will be. 

Remember, people invest in people first and music second, that’s also why fans want to engage with the person behind the music as well as just listening to the music. They want to know what you are like as a person, because if they like and relate to you on a human level then they are more likely to relate to your music. It’s the same with making industry connections. If they know the person behind the music, then they have a reason to care about your music and your career. 

However, if you find networking hard or are struggling with making connections during lockdown, then you should come to one of our new Online Networking Events. The first one is completely free and will take place in September – Keep an eye on our social media (below) for new updates. 

It’s the perfect opportunity to meet new industry figures, as we will have a guest attendee at every session, as well as network with like-minded musicians to skill-swap and discuss issues and topics in music.  

Every session will include resources you can take from the event, a guest member of the music industry and grant you access to an exclusive networking group for musicians on Facebook, where we engage in discussion and promote safe and healthy networking opportunities for musicians. 

How do you network? What are your tips and tricks for meeting new people? Share your thoughts down below and let us know what you think on social media by tagging us below. 

Statistics and quotes in the article are available here:  

  1. https://www.businessinsider.com/things-people-decide-about-you-in-seconds-2016-11?r=US&IR=T#people-judge-how-much-they-should-trust-another-person-after-only-just-meeting-them-1 
  1. https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-make-a-great-first-impression-2014-1?r=US&IR=T 

#music #musicbiz #musicbusiness #networking #lockdown #covid19 #coronavirus #industry #psychology #event #online #businessinsider #jeanbaur #howto #tips #tricks #advice #guidance #oppurtunity #meeting #new #people #career #musician #diyartist #diymusic #diymusician #indpreneur #musicpreneur #entrepreneur #social #media #musicscene #local #success #skill  


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The Future of The Music Industry: Post Covid-19

Corona Virus, Covid-19, Infinite Vibrations, Innovation, Music Industry

Has Covid-19 crippled the music industry, or will it help shape our future for good? 

The current music industry is uncertain…but has Covid-19 been a force for bad, or has it enabled us to re-think the music industry for the better? Let’s look at this once in a lifetime phenomenon and see what it means for the future of music creators. 

The cancellation of Live Performances 

Firstly, let’s talk about the Live Performance side of the music industry. With the global music industry being worth $50 billion, the live performance side of this makes up 50% of the industry. However, it was this crucial part of a musician’s career that was most affected. As musicians base most of their income on live performances and events, it was a drastic loss to their income when most, if not all, of these live events were cancelled or postponed; especially during the summer months when musicians can make the most of their income due to the festival period.  

But why was this such a gamble in the first place? 

Well, musicians earn most of their income from live events because of the way the music industry has changed in recent years. With the invention of the internet came a wave of new technology which caused changes in the ways we consume music. That being streaming sites, first started by Napster and now most popular with Spotify. Music has become a commodity that you can listen to virtually for free, and with Spotify’s subscription model of business, this pays very little out to musicians per stream; £0.0028 to be exact. According to data from The Trichordist, an active movement which campaigns for an ethical and sustainable internet for music creators, sites like Pandora and YouTube are even worse, with Pandora paying £0.0016 and YouTube paying £0.0012 per stream. The best current site for music streaming, but still not able to pay a living wage, is Amazon, who pay £0.009 per stream.  

Average payout per stream by The Trichordist

“On average, it takes 343.5 streams to generate £1 and 2,947 streams to earn one hours UK minimum wage.” 

Infinite Vibrations

To add to this, major record labels earn $800,000 per hour from streaming sites and the tech giants that made these software’s also take a sizeable cut, leaving musicians in the fray. If it wasn’t musicians in the first place though, the record labels and the tech giants wouldn’t even have a business on which to build around music. 

So why do musicians get the worst cut in this deal? 

That’s a good question, and the unfair pay artists receive from streaming is something that multiple musicians and organizations have recently begun to fight against. This comes in the form of the #brokenrecord and #keepmusicalive hashtag and we fully support this. Infact Scottish singer-songwriter KT Tunstall recently released a video explaining all this on BBC radio 5 Live as part of their “Re-think” series. Check it out here: 

KT Tunstall on the future of music streaming

After a lack of income from streaming, this means that musicians can earn more of an income from live music than recorded music, so this is the much-preferred income stream; albeit just not during the corona virus lockdown/pandemic. Regular events aren’t seen to return until 2021, when even then there will be tight health restrictions which limit attendees furthermore limiting the revenue generated from ticket sales. 

Although, we are starting to see some resurrection of live music. Prestigious artists such as Dizzie Rascal, Gary Numan and The Lightening Seeds have all signed on to play drive-in gigs. The audience will be completely restricted to their car and see’s live performances being able to adhere to social-distancing rules whilst being able to still take place.  

This is all well and good for artists who have a big enough following and the funds to be able to pull something like this off, but what about the independent and unsigned artists? 

Music venues in dire need of help 

Well, this is where it gets a little dark… independent artists’ usual performance spaces, grass roots music venues, are facing a dire time indeed. Due to the lockdown, many of these venues have not been able to bring in an income are still facing rent charges by their landlords or brand businesses who own, but do not manage, the venues. 

Recently, a 5-stage plan to re-open theatres and art spaces was released by the UK government to outline the return of theatres and art spaces, which went like this: 

UK Government’s 5-stage plan to re-open theatres and art spaces

However, this has been unacceptable as it will still see many venues go out of business by the time step 5 has come around; cutting it very close and causing a lot of stress on venue owners. 

“Only 17% of grass roots music venues were reported as being financially secure until July 8th

William Ralson

In response to this, the Music Venue Trust, a charity which acts to protect grass roots music venues, sent an open letter to the UK government asking them to deliver more support to these establishments. This included two calls to action: 

1. A £50 million financial support package 

2. A VAT reduction on future ticket sales 

In reality, the music industry is not receiving the help that it deserves… the UK music industry contributed £5.2 billion to the UK economy in 2018 and it feels like we are still trying to prove the importance of music to the government, besides the fact that people wouldn’t have mentally survived lockdown without the arts or creativity. 

But you can help music venues to recover. In a video posted by the CEO of the Music Venue Trust on Facebook, he is calling people to send the open letter they have written to your local MP, in a bid to raise awareness of this issue and save music venues in the UK; and we implore you to do the same. Check out his video here: 

Music Venue Trust CEO tells you how to write to your MP to prevent the permanent closure of hundreds of Grassroots Music Venues

You can also support this campaign by posting the #saveourvenues on social media. 

Unfortunately, this is only the tip of the iceberg for live performances, as the most major blow to this ecosystem is a new announcement made by Live Nation. 

The controversy of Live Nation 

Live Nation is the biggest music business responsible for live performance, ticketing and event management. They own Ticketmaster and generated $11.55 billion in revenue in 2019. 

So, you can imagine that they we’re also hit hard by the impact of corona virus, but not as bad as the grass roots music venues or independent musicians. Live Nation can still survive even if they took a profit hit from 2020, the low-to-mid tier artists can’t.  

They’ve released a change in their policy for live events in 2021. In order to protect their own assets, they’ve thrown musicians under the bus. In their policy changes they’ve proposed a 20% pay decrease for artists across the board. On top of this, musicians will be responsible for their own insurance and their own travel fees and the icing on the cake, if unforeseen circumstances cause the event to be cancelled, artists will not be paid at all.  

However, in a drastic turn of events, Live Nation have now redacted some of these policy changes due to how they we’re boycotted by nearly every musician this was affected by. 

“If artists weren’t treated poorly already, they sure are now.” 

Infinite Vibrations

Musicians have already been dealt a bad hand, in that they can’t earn a decent wage from recorded music and now it seems their most important income stream is also being taken away.  

So where does that leave musicians? 

Re-defining your music career and the future of the music industry 

By now you’ve probably become a little fed up with the way the industry is treating musicians, and the impact of corona virus hasn’t helped one bit. But, if it wasn’t for musicians creating music, we wouldn’t even have an industry in the first place. So why is it that musicians are always the ones getting dealt the worst cards? 

Day by day the companies which are sat at the top of the music chain are ripping off musicians and taking them for granted. From record labels doing dodgy deals with artists, to promoters who have a bad rep for not even paying artists, as well as the streaming services who pay next-to-nothing for the music that their companies are built on. Even now during corona virus, Live Nation would rather musicians suffered than take a profit loss themselves. 

“We think it’s time for change… and now more than ever would be the right time to re-evaluate the way we think about the music industry.” 

Infinite Vibrations

We see the future of the music industry as being independent and we predict that in the next 5-10 years the independent music industry will grow exponentially, but we also think that Covid-19 has accelerated this underlying trend. 

To bring about a change in the industry, you should think about turning independent. This is because as an independent musician, you retain control over your career and over your music, instead of a record label or a manager who might not have your best interests at heart. We’re not saying everyone is bad and if you want to be signed then you can be, but an independent record label or an independent manager probably cares more about your music then a stakeholder at a major record label. We’re saying that if you become an independent artist, you can get more out of your career. 

On top of this, to earn a living wage from your music, you must consider becoming an entrepreneur; because creating music for a living is the dream isn’t it? This is a mindset and once you begin to see your music through the eyes of an entrepreneur, you will begin to open-up more income streams from your music career. Therefore, enabling you to earn a wage from creating music. For example, you don’t have to be the stereotypical celebrity musician to be successful, as there are more ways to earn an income from your music than just the Hollywood route to fame. Such as freelancing, teaching and livestreaming, as well as releasing your own music.  

We understand that corona virus has been a negative hit to an already unfair industry. But we feel the pandemic has enabled us to highlight the issues in the music industry and provide an opportunity to adapt and make changes for a more positive and constructive future in music. 

What do you think about the music industry? Should we change, or do you think the corona virus is just a blip in the road? Let us know your thoughts down below. 

Statistics in this article are available here:  

  1. https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/05/this-is-how-covid-19-is-affecting-the-music-industry/ 
  2. https://www.esquire.com/uk/culture/a32360709/coronavirus-music-industry/ 
  3. https://thetrichordist.com/category/music-streaming/ 

#brokenrecord #keepmusicalive #saveourvenues #independentmusicindustry #futureofthemusicindustry #streaming #livemusic #entrepreneur #independentmusician #coronavirus #covid19 


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