A Comprehensive Guide to Networking in the Music Industry

Advice and guidance, Corona Virus, Covid-19, How to, Infinite Vibrations, Music Industry, Networking, Uncategorized

Strategies and methods for networking, even in lockdown. 

Networking is the key to unlocking doors of opportunity within the music industry. Whether it be through meeting your next music collaboration or striking up a conversation with a label executive – meeting people outside of your circle of influence is important to your career because they could bring value and opportunities which can’t be found on your own.  

Although, during a time where events have been cancelled due to the Covid-19 lockdown, it can be hard to meet new people. As well as this, networking can be scary, awkward and a difficult skill to master. 

Fortunately, there are several strategies within networking which can mitigate the initial awkwardness, allow you to network even in lockdown and bridge the gap between your career and its next success.  

You’ve all heard that first impressions count, but did you know why? Let’s explore the psychology and theory behind meeting new people. 

The Psychology of Networking 

Unfortunately, as humans, we have the survival mechanism of deciding what we think of someone new within just 3 seconds of meeting them! People make assumptions based on the clothes you wear, your appearance, how successful you are and how aggressive you are.  

Psychologists call this “Thin Slicing.” 

Other people’s assumptions of you is also based on your status and wealth. In a small study conducted by Dutch researchers they found that “people wearing name-brand clothes — Lacoste and Tommy Hilfiger, to be precise — were seen as higher status and wealthier than folks wearing non-designer clothes” 

Their research concluded that no other social dimensions affected this outcome. Not even attractiveness, kindness or trustworthiness, just status and wealth. Now this sounds shallow, but it is an instinctual process to help protect us and determine whether or not someone is endangering our survival. Fortunately, we can hack this instinct to be perceived as a valuable member of the music industry through our fashion and social skills. 

“If you’ve ever wondered why businessmen and women always wear a suit, this is why.” 

Infinite Vibrations

You can achieve an instant rapport with someone if you wear a suit. When you wear a suit, you automatically convey success to somebody. It symbolizes that you are succeeding, and this has a big effect on people. But don’t think that you must be a stiff and dress formal everyday – especially in the music industry, as we tend to be more expressive and relaxed when it comes to wearing a uniform. However, a t-shirt/blazer combo can achieve the same effect whilst blending casual/formal attire. 

On top of this, you can convince many people of your value by the way you speak. By being slightly more expressive and maybe a little more dramatic, you can make people take notice of what you are saying, just by the way you are saying it. As well as this, if you want to make a point, then less is more. If you’re naturally a quiet person than this can play to your advantage. Timing is everything and if can say something at the right time – it can leave a big impact. 

Now you know how to network with new people, it’s time to learn where to network. 

Where to network in the music industry 

There are many places to network within the music industry. From social media to supporting your local music scene or straight-up attending networking events; Here’s 6 gates into networking

There has never been so much freedom to networking than there is on social media, especially during the current times, where everything has been converted to digital events due to the coronavirus. Some of the best platforms for networking are Facebook, Instagram, Reddit and LinkedIn. 

  1. Facebook 

Facebook gives you access to groups where you can pose questions, engage in a discussion and learn more about a specific topic in the music industry. Try searching for “(your location) music scene” or “(your location) musicians” as well as broader search terms such as “music producers” or “musician support group” and join these groups. 

Initially you may be reluctant to post or comment in these groups but once you feel confident enough, remembering the internet can be a cruel place so wear your tough skin, you should give your thoughts and opinions to these groups, who will then recognise that you are delivering value to them and return the favour when you need it.  

2. Instagram 

Instagram is the underdog of networking via social media. There aren’t many people who see this platform as a mainstream form of networking, which can make meeting new people a fresh experience.  

The first method to use on this platform is to “slide into DM’s” and whilst this may be a meme; it is also a great way to introduce yourself to new individuals. However, copy and pasting a mass message to loads of people about your new song is a definite way to get ignored or even blocked. You need to engage with these accounts before you message them. Give them a complement or ask them a constructive question and engage in a real, meaningful conversation. Get to know them before you talk about your music.  

As well as this, you should really explore hashtags on this platform. Look at the hashtags you are posting and then look at the hashtags your influencers are posting. Find the comparisons and then try to piggyback onto these hashtags and engage with other people who are posting the same or similar hashtags as you. This way can discover new people within your field of music and strike up connections all over the world.

3. Reddit 

Reddit can be a great source of making new connections as their sub-reddit pages act like Facebook groups. Here you can find like-minded musicians and even some industry operatives, especially if they are doing a Reddit AMA (QnA).  

You can search for specific genres and strike up conversation in a relatively anonymous way, in case you feel anxious about meeting new people. Remember, we have been told since birth that we shouldn’t speak to strangers, so it’s no wonder networking can feel weird at times, but this can be a great way around the anxieties of beginning to network.

4. LinkedIn 

Lastly, LinkedIn is a fantastic platform for networking. This is because it eliminates some of the social barriers surrounding the balance between professionalism and friendliness. It does this because LinkedIn as a platform is built for professionals to network with each other and inherently sets that precedent that if you reach out to someone, you assume they are trying to meet and network with you.  

As well as this, LinkedIn has seen organic growth boom due to its lateness to developing an advertisement service, meaning there is a lot of opportunity for people to naturally discover you without having to put that extra legwork into marketing and promotion. But, don’t think this will last forever, as LinkedIn will soon follow suit with Facebook in that they will try to charge you for ad space in order to reach a wider audience. 

5. Supporting your local music scene 

“Speak to other musicians in your scene as they will know who the promoters are, who the venue owners are, who the recording studios are and pretty much every contact you need to push your career from the bedroom and into the limelight” 

Infinite Vibrations

This is arguably the most important form of networking, especially in the early stages of your career. If you’re lucky enough to have a bustling music scene in your town or near where you live, then this will be the bouncing board which will propel your career forward. This is because any good musician or band has always started out surrounding themselves with their local scene and seeking the support of friends and family.  

Your local music scene are the first people who will support you and your music so you should make a conscious effort to become a part of it. Play as many shows as possible in this location and people will begin to recognise you as a house-hold name. As well as this, you should be proud to represent where you come from, as when you begin to spread your wings into other territories, these are the people who will remember you and shout about you from the roof-tops.  

Try to meet at least 3-4 people every time you go to your local venue, because you never know who you could be speaking with and who they know themselves. Just remember not to push your music on them straight away. This is because, if they are not working, they are probably on their down-time and want to relax rather than talk business. Engage in small talk to begin with, test the waters and then proceed to introduce your music to them. This way you are demonstrating that you want to get to know them instead of just using them to further your career. 

6. Conferences and networking events 

Once you have begun to take these first small steps into networking, you are then ready for the big leagues. Conferences and networking events are the crème-de-la-crème for gaining contacts in the music industry. This is because these events are organized for the sole purpose of meeting and engaging with other people and wider communities. They will often host a plethora of key industry figures such as: label executives, managers, promoters, successful musicians and enterprises which aim to help musicians. Here you can meet people who will make a BIG difference to the success of your career. 

As with any networking opportunity, it is best to prepare beforehand, especially for these types of events. First, you should identify who you want to make a connection with, who is attending this event? Choose 2-3 people within your field of music and learn about them, what are their likes/dislikes? Do they have a favorite drink? The more information you know about your desired contact the more points of conversation you will have. Ask them if they would like their favorite drink and go and buy it for them. If there’s something that they dislike then avoid a discussion about that or if you’re feeling confident, demonstrate your knowledge by engaging in a debate about it – just remember to remain courteous. 

On top of this, you need to make sure your web presence is in order. This is because if someone you meet goes to search you online, you need to have an attractive and up-to date website and social media, otherwise they might lose interest. To help encourage your new friends to go online and check out your stuff, you should always have business cards to hand with your website and social media handles advertised on them. They’re relatively cheap to produce now-a-days and they can mean the difference between staying in contact with someone or remaining a stranger. 

As well as this, you should follow-up each new contact with a nice message or email the morning after. This will show that you cared about the conversation and want to continue to develop the relationship outside of the event. Make sure you get the business card of the person you we’re speaking to, as well as handing out your own, so you can remember their contact details too. 

Building and maintaining relationships 

Once you have met someone new and made a connection with them post-event, it’s time to begin developing that relationship so you can benefit each other’s career. 

“If you find networking hard or are struggling with making connections during lockdown, then you should come to one of our new Online Networking Events” 

Infinite Vibrations

I’m sure you’ve all heard the age-old saying “It’s not WHAT you know, its WHO you know” but it’s no good knowing someone if you don’t know how to speak to them in a professional yet friendly manner. Being simultaneously professional yet friendly at the same time is the art of networking. 

It’s all about building a long-term mutually beneficial relationship. Investing time in developing a relationship with someone is one of the most important investments you can make in your career – and all its costs is your time and attention! This can be done by simply checking in on them every now and then or going to a coffee together, it doesn’t even have to be a business call. In fact, the more time you spend together as friends, the stronger your business relationship will be. 

Remember, people invest in people first and music second, that’s also why fans want to engage with the person behind the music as well as just listening to the music. They want to know what you are like as a person, because if they like and relate to you on a human level then they are more likely to relate to your music. It’s the same with making industry connections. If they know the person behind the music, then they have a reason to care about your music and your career. 

However, if you find networking hard or are struggling with making connections during lockdown, then you should come to one of our new Online Networking Events. The first one is completely free and will take place in September – Keep an eye on our social media (below) for new updates. 

It’s the perfect opportunity to meet new industry figures, as we will have a guest attendee at every session, as well as network with like-minded musicians to skill-swap and discuss issues and topics in music.  

Every session will include resources you can take from the event, a guest member of the music industry and grant you access to an exclusive networking group for musicians on Facebook, where we engage in discussion and promote safe and healthy networking opportunities for musicians. 

How do you network? What are your tips and tricks for meeting new people? Share your thoughts down below and let us know what you think on social media by tagging us below. 

Statistics and quotes in the article are available here:  

  1. https://www.businessinsider.com/things-people-decide-about-you-in-seconds-2016-11?r=US&IR=T#people-judge-how-much-they-should-trust-another-person-after-only-just-meeting-them-1 
  1. https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-make-a-great-first-impression-2014-1?r=US&IR=T 

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How To Make An Income During Lockdown

Corona Virus, How to, Infinite Vibrations, Uncategorized

5 revenue streams for musicians during corona virus 

It’s no secret that the corona virus pandemic has damaged the music economy. From the cancellation of nearly every gig and festival, to lockdown preventing musicians from making a quick recovery. This is a hard time for music artists. However, if its anything musicians are known for, it’s overcoming a challenge in the face of adversity, and there hasn’t been a challenge like corona virus in a long time. So, if want to make an income from your music during lockdown, here’s how… 

  1. Live streaming 

We talked about live streaming in our previous article. However, did you know you can monetize those streams and create an income from this kind of content? There are a few ways to do so but let’s start with the simplest.  

Donations. If you’ve set up a high-quality professional livestream, which you can find out how to do in our previous article here: https://infinitevibrations.co.uk/2020/04/15/how-to-set-up-a-high-quality-livestream-for-your-music/, then there’s a good chance people will donate to your cause, especially if they’re dedicated fans. 

As well as this, you could set up a Patreon or GoFundMe to provide fans with rewards for donating. Things such as exclusive content or merchandise. This way you are incentivising paid support from your fans whilst also providing them with a reward for doing so, making their donation worth something to them.  

On top of this, this method is great for creating those dedicated fans, as you can create a funnel to draw them in. Starting with your free piece of content (your livestream) and working up to paid exclusive content. This kills two birds with one stone in that you are developing an income for yourself as well as generating a fanbase who will stay with you after corona virus. 

Finally, if you are a well-developed musician/band you could consider making a paid ticketed stream, like a live event but without the physical appearance (unfortunately).  

For example, if you are charging £30 per ticket for a venue with a 300-person capacity, and you sold out, you would have made £9000. However, if you charge £10, a reduction to your normal rate which is already a selling point, and live streamed to 1000 people you will have made £10,000 – A 10% increase in revenue from the live event, and you wouldn’t have the overheads of travel expenses, eating out and staying in hotels. 

  1. Freelancing 

The world of freelancing is a wide and varied one. It can take some time to master but the financial rewards can be exponential. There are a few income streams with this one and it’s up to you how you want to pursue this. 

To begin let’s talk about music lessons. Chances are that if you’re an accomplished musician you know a thing or two about playing music. What better time than the covid-19 lockdown to start teaching your skills to someone else. This is because budding musicians will have plenty of time to practice and are willing to do so because they have so much time to spare. 

If you’ve got a successful music career behind you, this can be easy to sell too. People will be willing to put their faith, and money, in you – especially if you can say that you’ve been a successful musician in the past.  

You can begin charging small, £10 or £15 per hour and then once you have some great feedback and testimonials you can begin to raise this. Just be careful not to raise prices for current clients as that could cause them to lose interest. As well as this, you can host these lessons online via skype, Zoom or even Facebook. Keeping everyone safe and educated during lockdown. If you’re clients are younger aged children, chances are that their parents will be grateful for giving them something to do, so do be sure to market your lessons towards them too.  

Session musician. Perhaps you’ve played in a band or you’ve had a solo career for a long time, but have you ever considered being a session musician? This type of commission-based work requires you to work to a brief, but if you’re an agile and flexible musician this might be the work for you. 

There are a lot of people out there who require the skill and services of an accomplished musician. From guitar to bass, saxophone to violin; many people will have projects that require the sound of the instrument that you play.  

Try websites such as Freelancer or Fiverr, as many of these platforms let you advertise your skills to a potential client to come and scout out. As well as this, you should join communities and networks of composers who may also require your skills; on social media such as Facebook and LinkedIn.  

What work you take on is up to you but there is a lot of revenue to be made by going down this route and you will be surprised at the amount of people who need session work to be done. Especially if people are creating more music because there are in lockdown.  

Sound packs, samples, loops and beats. If you’re a DJ or producer, then this is perfect for you. However, you may also be a more instrument-based musician who knows how to create music in a DAW. Selling sound packs, samples, loops and beats has become a growing sector of the music industry and there are lots of companies investing in this to create a bespoke service where you can purchase such a thing.  

Companies such as Splice or Arcade by Output are some such companies. If you create a sample or loop, you can sell these products on these platforms.  

As well as this, if you create sound packs and beats, you can sell these to rappers, musicians and singers to provide them with backing tracks for their music. Bear in mind that when you sell these products you waver the copyright to them, but this seems reasonable because you are getting paid to do so. Otherwise this would be a collaboration between yourselves and you would split the profits made from the final piece between each party; which is also a viable option too.  

  1. Podcasts and Radio 

Now there is a lot of current debate about these two different types of audio platforms, in that podcasting seems to be getting extremely popular and radios are dying out, although I don’t think this is true, it’s just that radio seems to an often harder platform be featured on. However, each comes with their own advantages and disadvantages.  

Let’s start with radios. We all know the typical radio station that we hear on our phones, laptops and stereos. These can be a good form of income if you can get featured on them and if you have signed up to a royalty collection agency such as PRS or PPI. But this can take some time if you have not already done so and coronavirus isn’t going away anytime soon. 

So, podcasts are your best friend. These are more independently hosted and crop up everywhere on the internet. Whilst you may not generate as much income from this as you would from radio, the chances of you being able to get your music on these are greatly increased; if you target the correct shows and correct demographic for your genre of music that is.  

On top of this, it is becoming increasingly popular for artists to start podcasts of their own. Whilst it can take time to garner a following and fanbase, much like your music, this can be a great platform for potential sponsorships and brand partnerships who will be willing to pay you to get access to your audience. Just make sure that when you do so, you advertise a product or service that aligns with your general style and morals, in order to stay relevant to your audience and not put them off.  

  1. Busking, Nursing homes and Community groups 

With the lockdown easing soon in July, it seems more appropriate to begin generating revenue from physical appearances again. However, venues and festivals will not be opening for a long time still to come. If you feel comfortable with doing so, the following income streams could be a great way to kickstart live music again. However, with these methods being outside the realm of lockdown be sure to think it through and adhere to any safeguarding guidelines for yourself and the public. 

Why not try your hand at busking? Create a two-meter perimeter around yourself and place a bucket at the edge. Especially with shops opening again, there will be an influx of people going about town and wanting a distraction from the confusion and panic of Covid-19 and perhaps they have a bit of spare change for that welcome sound of good music. Just be sure to wash your hands after handling your hard-earned cash and abide by the lockdown rules where necessary. 

Perhaps contacting your local council to check if you are able to do so would be a good idea and if you didn’t know, some counties ask for a busking license in some areas, so check for that too.  

On top of this, why not try playing in nursing homes and community groups. As I’m sure they’ve seen a wave of upset recently and could do with a pick-me-up of live music. What a great way to celebrate the beginning of the end and do some good in your community. Although, with care homes being in the high-risk category, you may require a test to make sure you don’t have the virus beforehand.  

  1. Miscellaneous  

Finally, a few other options for income streams are merchandise and residencies.  

Merchandise can take some funds to set up if you haven’t already got some, but perhaps handmaking some goodies could be a good way to spend your spare time. As well as this, if you’re creating your own products, that’s a great way to practice entrepreneurship and learn about the fundamentals of creating a profitable income stream – something which will come in handy in your music career in the future.  

On top of this, you could try and secure paid residencies at magazines, radios, podcasts or promotion agencies as they are all likely livestreaming and need talent to book for their streams.  


In conclusion, there are many methods to generate income during coronavirus. Above all you need to remember to stay positive in this situation and allow yourself to adapt, improvise and overcome. Like I mentioned before, musicians are some of the most resilient people in the world and I guarantee you that the industry will make it through this; but only if we work together and find ways to survive.  

If you have any questions or just want to share your thoughts, then please get in contact with us on our social media below. 

If you need help with your music career and navigating these strange times, then you can contact us for a FREE 30-minute career consultancy session and we’ll help you get back on track. 


Contact us here:

  • infinitevibrations0@gmail.com 

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